Leveling Through Misandry – Levels 60 to 70

Misandry stands in Zangarmarsh in her clown outfit. Levels 1-10
Levels 11-20
Levels 20-30
Levels 30-40
Levels 40-50
Levels 50-60

I admit that I don’t have a ton of really groovy screenshots from Outlands because, as far as I am concerned, most of the really cool stuff to do in Burning Crusade was the end-game content. I’m impetuous and wanted to hit 70 as fast as possible so I could do the worst bout of leveling content directly after that. I’m a sucker for pain and torture, mea culpa. Look at that clown suit. Look at that. That is quintessential clown suit. Illidan was right, I was not prepared.

Spells

The last bracket of leveling was easily the last time you will get a boatload spells across ten levels. Between 60-85, updates to your spellbook will be a little more sparse. It might be good on your wallet as well as your brain. This means that most of your “core” abilities are locked in place with additional end-game functionality and quality of life spells coming down the pipe. That being said, you get Teleport: Shattrath and Portal: Shattrath at 62 and 66 respectively. Six levels and you get transportation options! Are you quivering with excitement yet? I bet you are. Mage Armor shows up at level 68; this is actually rather crucial for arcane mages. Mage Armor is your armor, for the rest of us it is something we throw on occasionally during downtime for the mana regen or resistances, but arcane mages must use this all the time. Consider it the combustion engine of your DPS bus. Why Blizzard is giving arcane mages this so late is beyond me as I noticed some mana challenges earlier in the game playing as arcane, but I digress. At level 70, you get your last spell for the bracket: Spellsteal. This is an intensely powerful offensive dispel. Blizzard’s knocked the mana costs up over time to keep us from spamming it in PVP, but that’s not stopped any mage who wants to try and put pressure on a resto druid or shaman. Besides PVP, spellsteal comes in handy in PVE as well. Many mobs in dungeons and across the land often cast powerful buffs on themselves that stealing will not only be useful to you, but also help smooth the fight along. You can also just get silly with what can be spellstolen – Shadow Labyrinth anyone? As for macros, here is what I use personally to get the best bang for your buck on Spellsteal:

#showtooltip Spellsteal
/stopcasting
/cast [@target,mod:alt] Spellsteal
/cast [@focus,exists,harm] Spellsteal; Spellsteal

What this does is that it allows you to stop your cast to Spellsteal something on the fly (crucial on raid boss fights, see Maloriak) and then cast Spellsteal at either your mouse-over target or your actual target. Having a mouseover function allows people to Spellsteal off of arena frames, raid frames or boss frames available via some user interfaces.

Talents

I blame my newness to the frost spec as the reason why I didn’t tell you guys to take Piercing Chill sooner. At the advice of faithful reader Dave Signal, I recommend this for your spec after you fill in 2 points into Improved Freeze. Piercing Chill is what Frost Mages essentially do to “cleave” – like fire mages and Living Bomb splash/Impact, Piercing Chill applies a chill effect to other targets and gives you more Brain Freeze and Fingers of Frost procs in the process. Last point, after spending the four between Improved Freeze and Piercing Chill, goes into Deep Freeze. This is a very strong part of your DPS as well as overall control. Deep Freeze can only be cast on frozen targets (such as things rooted with Frost Nova) – however, you do remember that Fingers of Frost is your proc that pretends that the target is frozen, yes? This means that you can cast Deep Freeze while FoF is up. It behooves you to cast Deep Freeze on cooldown and having continuous FoF procs helps with this. On targets that can be frozen, it will actually stun them inside of a giant block of ice. On things like bosses, Deep Freeze loses the stun portion and just does extra damage. (0/0/31)

Fire goes in a similar fashion (0/31/0) of filling out talents to get to your 31 point ability – drop your points into Molten Fury and Critical Mass until you get Living Bomb at 69. Now, Living Bomb is one of those iconic spells of the tree, in my opinion. Living Bomb is your only hard-cast DoT as fire, unlike those applied by spells or crits like Pyroblast or Ignite. It caps at 3 targets (unlike the days of LB spam in Icecrown Citadel) but can be nearly infinitely spread outwards if via Impact. Living Bomb ticks do not trigger Hot Streak because it is periodic damage but it is very important to have Living Bomb going on any target that you wish to use Combustion on. In addition to the damage that Living Bomb does on a target when it is ticking, it will also splash fire damage outwards on any targets in range if it reaches the end of its duration and isn’t refreshed. This can be very nice on a boss with adds. If the boss does not have other mobs around it, it is sometimes better DPS to “clip” Living Bomb to keep it rolling with a new application. A very nice Living Bomb macro that can be used in PVP or raiding with arena/boss frames is:

#showtooltip Living Bomb
/cast [@mouseover,harm] Living Bomb;
/cast [@target,harm] Living Bomb;

This means that Living Bomb will cast on whatever harmful target you have your mouse hovering over (say another boss frame) unless you just have something targeted; it will apply there instead.

Arcane has two directions you can go and I tended towards the one that would give you the most bang for your talent point bucks. Since you filled out Nether Vortex last time, you could spend 3 points into Torment the Weak. I went towards dropping one point in TtW, then used the remaining 4 points for Improved Mana Gem (which turns your mana gem as a DPS cooldown), Focus Magic, and then finally your 31-point talent Arcane Power. (31/0/0)

Does this group of talent acquisitions seem a little too much all at once? Here’s a brief explanation about how they all work together:

Arcane Power

The upshot of AP is that it increases your damage by 20 percent, but it comes with a price. It also makes your spells cost a lot more mana, meaning it is a cooldown with a slight penalty and as an arcane mage, this factors into the length of your burn phase. You don’t have to worry about this as much as a level 60 or 70 mage since you have much shorter fights. Just use it like other DPS cooldowns for now.

Focus Magic

Focus Magic is a unique reciprocative mage buff that only Arcane mages get and it definitely pairs nicely with Arcane Tactics in terms of overall buffs you give groups. There’s a lot of math that’s been tossed around about priorities for who you should give FM to (because it will also buff your own DPS), but outside of a raid situation it is sometimes rare that you will even be paired with another caster. I usually stick Focus Magic on a healer in a 5-man dungeon group. If you are in a 10-man setting, Focus Magic typically goes on Fire Mages (need to help our fiery friends out), then boomkins or elemental shaman. Certain warlock specs and shadow priests are also nice too, but not as fundamentally good. The key is to give it to someone who would a) benefit from the crit and in turn b) make sure the crit buff stays up on you most of the fight duration.

Improved Mana Gem

Just imagine this is giving you an extra motivation to use your mana gem! Arcane Mages use theirs all the time, but using one strategically to give you mana as well as a nice little DPS boost is awesome. Treat it like a trinket and drag your mana gem (the item itself, not the conjure spell) onto your action bars for easy use! Getting into good habits this early in your mage career will make you better when you hit 85.

The way you use your cooldowns at 85 is pretty straightforward as well but features heavily into something called a burn/conserve rotation. For now, popping Arcane Power, your mana gem, Mirror Images and any trinkets you have should suffice at the beginning of a fight. Presence of Mind can be used to cast an Arcane Blast on the go or getting 4 stacks of Arcane Blast up in a hurry. Beware though, it does share a cooldown with Arcane Power!

Gear

Outlands sets most of the progress we’ve been making with gear back by a ways. This is for several reasons; most of it has to do with the fact that Burning Crusade was the second expansion in WoW’s development cycle but has largely been un-updated since then. When it was relevant, a lot of players first ran into something called “gear inflation” – greens that they were getting from their first few quests and drops outstripped the amount of basic stats like intellect and stamina that they had on even high-level raiding epics.  You will run into this. However the secondary problem is that this gear also suffered through the initial +healing/+spellpower merge (which made +healing to just flat +spellpower) then later the +spellpower —> +intellect conversion. A lot of an item’s stat weight that had just spellpower as its “green stat” got turned into spirit to compensate.

This means that in order to survive the beating you will take wearing good level 40s/50s blues, picking up STA-heavy, SPI-laden gear isn’t such a bad idea. There’s some greens and blues you get early on in Hellfire Peninsula questing and dungeoning that will be a boon to you all the way to 70s, especially if you do not use heirlooms.

Mantle of Magical Might
Mindfire Waistband
Shadowcast Tunic
Mirren’s Drinking Hat

PS: Sorry no ding shot here, I missed it while leveling.

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Leveling Through Misandry – Levels 30 to 40

Stop that, Murkablo!

Levels 1-10

Levels 11-20

Levels 20-30

Try not to let the 30s to 40s knock you flat on your magely butt. There’s a lot of challenges out there, but this is halfway-ish to the leveling finish line! I know that Murkablo was just grumpy that we only ever got Uldaman and nothing fun like Scholomance yet. Keep your pets in line, mages!

Spells

Welcome to the 30-40 bracket, where all the mage spells you start to get tend to be less about your primary use nukes and cooldowns, but rather what I like to call “quality of life” spells. Things that make your time spent as a mage relaxing, enjoyable and frankly, kick ass over other classes. You got a taste of this when you got your Teleport spells last bracket, but now that you’ve come this far, prepare for the magical equivalent of riding around in a Bentley, waving over your shoulder at the warlocks and rogues crying on the side of the road. (Okay, maybe not like that, but come on, we’re pretty awesome.)

At 32 you get Slow Fall, which may seem like an unusual and frankly unnecessary spell, but as any veteran mage can tell you, will literally save your life. If you are a mage that spends any amount of time exploring the world or going into battlegrounds, the ability to descend gracefully and not hit the ground with a caster-shaped crater (preferably while popping off several instant cast spells) is beyond useful. Slow Fall does just that – it slows your falling speed. You float off at a diagonal towards the ground until you land on something solid. Keep in mind though two things – it costs a reagent (Light Feathers, which are not purchasable off vendors) and it only lasts for 30 seconds. However, you can cast it on other party members or yourself. Just make sure you are targeting the right person. It becomes a lot more handy if you use the glyph to improve the spell, but I’ll discuss that in our glyphs section this round.

Molten Armor (level 34) and Mage Ward (level 36) are really nice to get at this stage in your leveling. One thing that mages should always have on, no matter what they are doing, are their armors. Much like a warlock’s armor or a paladin’s aura, an armor defines certain benefits and defenses. They still have a limited time meaning you have to refresh them every 30 minutes, but that’s the only downside. Molten Armor grants you extra critical strike chance and reduces your chance to be hit. Fire and frost mages will value this more than arcane mages later on in the game, but for right now it is your only armor and you should wear it! As for Mage Ward, this is a very easy way to reduce a portion of any incoming frost, fire or arcane damage. Granted, it is using a global cooldown but you can’t really beat spell damage reduction. There are talents that make this better, and if you eventually move into raiding at end-game, using it will make your healers love you. It is definitely part of a conscientious mage’s arsenal against smear-age.

Now for the moment I’m sure you’ve been waiting for – the ability to conjure food. That’s right, at level 38, you gain Conjure Refreshment. This is your ticket to reducing incoming costs for your budget and never needing to grocery shop ever again. Granted, conjured food is slightly behind the best available food for your level but if you forget to buy things like I do, it will work in a pinch. As well as being good for regening mana and health, this food turns into a new kind of sweet treat as you level up. (Right now, your conjured food is gingerbread! Yum!) Other players will love your food too – so much in fact that they will ask you for it four pulls into a dungeon. *facepalm*

Talents

Five new talent points again, but where to spend them?

Since I jumped ahead tiers last time to take Icy Veins, this time I took two steps and filled out Icy Floes, now that I have a spell or two that actually benefits from it. Reducing your cooldown on both important DPS and defensive spells is always handy and means that you can pop them more often on longer fights. Now, do I continue along the second tier of talents or do I solidly move to the third tier? The effectiveness of the second tier’s talents (like Improved Cone of Cold and Piercing Chill) still feels like a side-grade benefit so I hopped down the third tier to Fingers of Frost. Fingers of Frost is a really powerful proc that treats your target as being “frozen” despite not literally so; this means that spells that boost damage against frozen targets should be your choice when you get the proc.

Fingers of Frost spell proc graphic.

Your talent tree should now look like this: (0/0/16).

Fire definitely takes the cake in terms of getting the most interesting choices and additions to their spellcasting this time. With their five points, they not only can get Hot Streak (which is a instant-cast proc Pyroblast), but also movable Scorch that costs no mana (Firestarter and Improved Scorch), as well as Blast Wave, a great AOE ability that does damage and slows mobs. I chose Firestarter over Combustion (despite my similar choice for Icy Veins in Frost), as I felt movable scorch was more of a benefit to questing and BGs rather than a straight dungeon-based ability.  You can pick up Combustion first however if you are dungeon grinding. Your talent tree now looks like this: (0/16/0).

This is what the spell alert for Hot Streak looks like.

Bringing up the rear is arcane at (16/0/0). You get one new ability (Presence of Mind) as well as finishing off another talent (Missile Barrage.) You pick up Arcane Flows (which is identical to Icy Floes for arcane) and begin filling out Prismatic Cloak. POM used to be a lot stronger of a talent when Pyroblast was a baseline mage ability and you could instant-cast it using POM as an arcane mage, but given that Arcane Power and POM share a cooldown, and Fire has it now as a talented ability, the days of PoM-Pyro is gone. It is now part of an arcane mage’s very limited toolbox for DPS mobility or conjuring on the fly. Prismatic cloak may seem unsubstantial now, but when you fill it out for all 3 points, it gives you instant, no fade Invisibility. Great, yah?

Misandry stands on the seal of Lordaeron in the throne room.

Glyphs (New!)

I stupidly neglected this little section for my last part of the guide, and for that, I am sorry. At level 25, you gain your first of three Prime, Major and Minor Glyph slots. The idea between each kind of glyph slot is that they focus on giving certain kinds of spells a little extra usefulness or flavor. Prime Glyphs augment your main nukes – additional damage modifiers are typical here. There’s very little choice here; most of your nukes are heavily spec-based, so it’s easy to pick out what you should be glyphing. Major Glyphs tend to play around with a lot of secondary spells or cooldowns, there’s a little more width of choice here depending on what kind of play you want to do. Lastly, Minor Glyphs are strictly for fun/flavor or adding bonuses to quality of life spells. There’s not many of them, so it makes choosing them a lot more for “fun.”

So what should you be picking for your first glyphs? For me, it was fairly easy. As my Prime Glyph, I went with Glyph of Frostbolt. No brainer, obviously, and Fire and Arcane should be going Glyph of Fireball and Glyph of Arcane Blast, respectively. At this point, however, the most useful Major glyph available to leveling mages is Glyph of Evocation, full stop. Having a mana and health regen during combat is so useful; everyone should take it no matter what. Lastly, I took Glyph of Slow Fall so I wouldn’t have to worry about having Light Feathers.

To use a glyph, click on the item in your bags. Then press “N” to open up your talents and glyphs panel (if you have not re-bound it, otherwise use the panel on your UI), and apply the glyph from your list to the circle slots.

Note: I am aware that glyphs, even ones for basic abilities, can be very expensive on some servers. As you are leveling, it is not as big of deal as it might seem if you don’t have glyphs right away. If you are short on cash, perhaps buy or gather some herbs and parchment and find a helpful guildie or person on your server to make it for you. Otherwise, you can wait until later to try and buy the glyphs you need. Don’t fret if you don’t have the big money in-game just quite yet. Save it for things like a mount!

"You're looking very fashionable today, Misandry."

 Gear

Matching colors and items! How novel! That is what you can expect during this portion of leveling – many quests in zones help itemize you sensibly as well and look snappy.  You’ll starting seeing more choices in head-gear as well as all your slots. Darkcleric’s Veil/Veil of Aerie Peak is a great blue quest reward from a quest in the Hinterlands (and it looks like a face mask, so cool.) Whitemane’s Chapeau from Scarlet Monastery – Cathedral is a classy and classic choice.

The only problems I really ran into with gear in this bracket was between some overlapping quest items or slots covered by dungeon drops having wildly different stat allocations. One example of this was two questions offering me two belt choices – one had +11 INT, one had +8 STA, +4 INT, and gave me a bunch of hit. Which seems like the better choice? Lots of intellect is great, but so is hit? This sort of stuff can get really confusing. Typically, even though HIT is my best stat for not missing on mobs, more INT should win out. It just is a flat DPS boost no matter how you slice it. A good way of determining which piece of gear is better when it has identical kinds of stats on it is which has more if you added all the “numbers” up. Hit is better than crit, haste is better than crit in a lot of ways.

Still, always prioritize for intellect if you can. If you get some gear that has spirit on it, don’t fret. While spirit does zippo for mages, if it also has intellect on it, it is an upgrade. As more gear becomes diversified for healers versus casters, it’ll be considered better if you let healers in your group roll over you on spirit items, but for now, anything that has more intellect should be something you pick. Intellect/stamina gear is fairly plentiful from quests, however. Secondary stats like haste are starting to become more plentiful, especially if you do dungeons. Now that you might be seeing this, let’s explain what haste actually does.

Haste is what makes your spell casting go faster. It sounds simple but it can mean a few things – casting faster means technically more DPS. It also means you run out of mana faster, as you have less time to regen while casting. It also can speed up ticks of some DoTs and reduce your global cooldown by a small margin. Haste also only goes so far, especially when you get to the level where Heroism/Time Warp/Bloodlust is concerned. You can only speed up your casts down to 1 second. Under one second and you will be effectively locked out by the global cooldown between all your spells. That is what most casters that are working around a lot of the time when they talk about racials, cooldowns in regards to a “haste cap.” Early haste gains in leveling tend to be talented or profession cooldowns like Lifeblood.

Remember that all these things are explained if you mouseover a stat on  your character sheet, take a look there sometime. Just remember to look under “General” “Attributes” or “Spell” like in the graphic, Ranged/Melee is for other classes that do Ranged attacks (with their weapons) or melee attacks. “Resistances” isn’t really important right now.

Misandry dings level 40 with her friends.

>> Levels 40-50

Leveling Through Misandry – Levels 11 to 20

Misandry runs with her water elemental and forsaken forces.

Levels 1-10

The best laid plans of mice and mages often go awry, and in my case, that means having to spec frost at the utmost insistence of some of my Twitter followers. They felt that the poll put me squarely back into my wheelhouse and that the point of a leveling guide was to learn something new. So here I am, with a loud bubbly friend. Frost has been fun so far and has made killing mobs a lot easier, but I suspect that is how it is now with every mage spec now. Back in my day, you had to wand and pray that you killed something. Now that we’re actually starting to get into the meat of leveling, I figured that I ought to break up the guides into sections for ease-of-use. Hopefully you’ll find this a bit more useful if you just need help with one specific part of leveling in each block.

Spells

11 through 20 gives you another block of very important utility and resource skills that as a mage; spells you should become accustomed to using. At level 12, you get Evocation. This is one of a mage’s main abilities to regen mana. If you eventually go on to become a full-time arcane mage, your rotation will basically rise and fall around this. As you gain the ability to use glyphs, Evocation will also be a nice way of regaining health in and out of combat. The only downside to this is that you have to stand still. Ticks of your Evocation will also shorten if you are taking prolonged damage (so try not to use it during an AOE ability from a mob.)

Polymorph is level 14 and is your first real crowd control. While Polymorph does tend to vanish at the drop of a hat if someone even so much as LOOKS at your sheep, it is considered one of the more prized crowd control abilities in that is it easily renewable and has no cooldown. A good mage will master the art of keeping a focus target sheeped and being able to polymorph on the fly and I will give you a great macro for how to do that:

#showtooltip Polymorph
/stopcasting
/clearfocus [mod:shift]
/focus [@focus,noexists]
/cast [@focus,exists,harm] Polymorph

This macro does a couple of things right off the bat – first, it stops your cast (meaning you can sheep on the fly if need be), secondly, it sets a focus if one does not exist already, and it casts Polymorph. It is going to set whatever you’re targeting and sheeping as your focus, so keep in mind that if you need to swap your focus/sheep target, you press the macro while holding down your modifer key (in this case is SHIFT). If you want to change your modifer key (to say, ALT or CTRL), you merely change the [mod:shift] part.  I also like to use my macro as a nice “set a focus” button as if you are out of range or a mob cannot be sheeped, it will just simply focus the mob you are targeting, provided it is a harmful entity. If you want to eventually use other spells besides just the flat Polymorph spell (like Polymorph: Black Cat, Polymorph: Pig), you can simply change the last line to this:

/castrandom [@focus,exists,harm] Polymorph, Polymorph(Rabbit), Polymorph(Black Cat)

The only problem you might run into is if you have other spells that work on a focus – such as Counterspell (like in our last guide). What I’ve done is used modifers in all my macros for those spells so in the fairly rare case I need to counterspell a non-focused target, while having a focus target polymorphed, I can shift-Counterspell the non-focus target and still keep my focus target sheeped. Glyphing Polymorph lets you turn your boring old sheep into a penguin or monkey as well, or allows polymorph to remove damage-over-time spells on a mob (a must for dungeons.)

The last utility spell you get is Blink, at level 16. Blink is easily one of the most live-saving spells you will get as a mage. It moves you quickly from place to place, it can get you out of places fast and it can move you over dangers that other classes have to muddle through. If you glyph it, it can even take you greater distances than before and Arcane has a talent that gives you a speed boost when you use it. In short, use it early, use it often, don’t Blink into a fire (as I have done many, many times.) Always have this key bound to something you can hit very easily.

Rounding this all out is Cone of Cold (level 18) and Arcane Blast (level 20.) Cone of Cold is a must-have instant cast melee range slow for Arcane and Frost mages (especially because you can talent it to be more effective), since Fire eventually gets Dragon’s Breath. CoC is good for keeping things that get right up in your face a little slowed so you can Blink back and pop off a well-timed Frostbolt or Arcane Blast.

Talents

From 11-20 you receive 6 talent points which means you begin picking talents from the top tier of your given talent tree. I am now frost, so my first six points (past the first one I placed in Early Frost) looks a little something like this: (0/0/6). When starting out on the first tier, or even as you are working down a tree, talents that give you a boost to how much damage you do, or make you cast faster, or give you more secondary stats are good things overall. Early Frost and Piercing Ice are great examples of these. Shatter is a little more obscure but it comes in handy later as you use more abilities that freeze a target and can be very handy when trying to kite a mob. As for fire and arcane mages? Your first seven points should look like this (0/6/0) and (6/0/0). Fire is a little less jazzy in terms of choices from early on; Master of Elements having a flat mana back from critical strikes (which are harder to come by at early gear levels) and Burning Soul giving you extra pushback protection is not very fun. Compared to the haste boosts of Arcane and Frost (Early Frost, Netherwind Presence), as well mana cost reduction (Arcane Concentration) and critical strike boosts (Piercing Ice), it feels a little blah. But never fear, Fire gets some fun toys later on.

A note: most of the builds I will be presenting in the guides tend to be a good balance of solo talents that are great for questing and a little bit for boosting your usefulness in dungeons. If you wish to level straight via dungeons, you might want opt toward builds that you see closer to 85 as they usually provide slightly more group utility and buffs. Most of the “solo” talents as well tend to veer into PVP utility and may not be overall as useful for PVE soloing. Remember that there is some variance in specs when leveling and picking things that you feel help you overall might be good to experiment with. Remember, you can always go back to the trainer and relearn your talents. However, leveling/raiding specs that tend to be given as the “best” are because they are fairly tried-and-true to perform most optimally in most PVE situations.

"Are we done shopping yet, Misandry? I'm tired."

Gear

Obviously this early on, gear will basically be whatever you pick up questing, in dungeons or off mobs. Always prioritize for intellect if you can. If you get some gear that has spirit on it, don’t fret. While spirit does zippo for mages, if it also has intellect on it, it is an upgrade. As more gear becomes diversified for healers versus casters, it’ll be considered better if you let healers in your group roll over you on spirit items, but for now, anything that has more intellect should be something you pick. Intellect and stamina gear is fairly plentiful from quests, however. Secondary stats like haste, crit or hit is very rare at this level, even if you do dungeons. Slots you won’t really see gear for  yet is shoulders (besides some white or grey ones), necklaces, head pieces, or trinkets. If you are an alt with heirlooms, this is largely meaningless to you!

At level 20, you get a class quest (Horde/Alliance) that takes you to Shadowfang Keep and gets you an awesome staff. Do this if you can!

Misandry dings level 20 with a cheer!

>> Levels 20-30

Leveling Through Misandry

When I started off asking people what they really wanted to see in a mage blog (again, heh), a lot of them really wanted to see some revamped mage leveling information. Since I haven’t levelled a mage in earnest since vanilla, I felt that this was a prime opportunity to do something really radical. Not only would I level a Horde character (which I have scant few), but I’d also write about my experiences so that new mage players could read along, watch the character grow and have some laughs along the way. Anyone is welcome along on this journey, but I plopped myself down on Mal’ganis, where I have some higher level friends so I wouldn’t be quite so lonely. Thus Misandry was born. (Name is tongue-in-cheek, I assure you. Or is it?)

Misandry the undead mage waves "hello." She's in starting gear.

Anyways, Misandry here is going to be levelled up (fast or slow, haven’t really decided) and every 10 levels or so, her progress will be recorded here in the form of guides that tell you what spells you get when, what content you might want to do, and what the overall experience is like for me. The only thing I cannot decide right now is what spec to play her as! So I ask you, faithful readers, to decide for me:

 

Once I get the answers in by Sunday, October 9th, I’ll get her past level 10. You can also follow my progress in bits and pieces on my Twitter account, which you can follow from the sidebar on the right side of my blog (@applecidermage).

Are any of you leveling a mage currently, comment and tell me a little about them!